Read Part 1

Better care for the mentally ill? Mostly bullshit. (Minus the mostly.)

And here’s where it gets difficult. Not for me to type, but for you to accept. When evidence is gathered and the deeply journalled forensics reveals that you, yes you, the parents are to blame, will you be ignorant or will you finally man or woman the (insert bad word) up? You did and are doing this to both your kids and yourselves. And because these heinous acts are pardoned by the script of the hypocritical mob of white-coated (insert bad word), you will not be imprisoned, but set free to do more harm.

My most recent read is a read that has left me flabbergasted. A new leap of perspective has been taken and a few bridges have been burned. It has been a while, a long while, since the many fonted pages before me could flip the script and smack me upside the skull with one big ‘WOW!’. In the past, it was The China Study. Today, I understand mental illness and I hope you will take the brief few minutes it takes to read today’s post or maybe the many more flips that amount to Robert Whitaker’s Anatomy of an Epidemic: Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America.

It’s an important read because the unshackled ‘we’ have imprisoned the youth in a fog. Trapped because they are not “adult” enough to make their own decisions, despite their incessant and annoying screams of rebellion. And the only thing that separates these pesky little tikes from the mentally unwell grown-ups we become is the cocktailed years that have kicked this storm into high gear.

This shit makes me shiver.

As the snow piles up outside and coats every un-roofed area with a glisten, our little world in the much bigger world becomes a bit numb and each balancing footstep is met with a crunch. This is a different sort of numb—a totally tolerable numb. Nothing near the one that sends shivers up my spine. Not a catastrophe waiting to happen, but a catastrophe forcefully shoved into existence.

“The serotonin theory of depression,” he wrote, with evident exasperation, “is comparable to the masturbatory theory of sanity.”

And before we make our way to the very similar tale of ‘dopamine’, we must take a moment and take note that this comment was voiced seven years ago. In 2005. It echoes and reverberates the past tones of exasperation that were uttered continually over—well, since the inception of meds for psychos. Not opinions, but an effort to make public the journalled evidence that has been hidden from the public and glossed via marketing ingeniousness as nothing short of a healthy pack of cigs. And smoke up we did. Are.

“Instead, as the psychopharmacology revolution has unfolded, the number of disabled mentally ill in the United States has skyrocketed.”

It’s this very promise of sleek that enwraps a nation in a tale told all too often. A tale that appears to glisten at first but rusts, as they all do, in time.

“Henry Cotton, superintendent at Trenton State Hospital in New Jersey, reported in 1916 that he cured insanity by removing his patients’ teeth.”

Right now. At this moment. We all know that this form of treatment is ironically loony at best. In the past, it was deemed necessary. Something the upcoming generation was gently nudged into, but for their own good of course! (Note heavy foreshadowing)

“If you took a minor tranquilizer,” he explained, “you might still feel scared when you see a car speeding toward you, but the fear would not make you run.”

Okay, let’s now meet the AMA—American Medical Association.

“It established a “propaganda department” to investigate the patent medicines and thus protected Americans from “quackery,” and it established a Council on Pharmacy and Chemistry to conduct chemical tests of the ethical drugs.”

In time, the dripping with trust FDA slipped in and the AMA relinquished its various duties to protect, hence the “useful drugs” book no longer being published. Instead, the AMA began to run ads in science and other medical-related journals for drugs not even approved by their very own council!

While the regulatory authorities were trying to line pockets and contribute their meat to the stew a brewin’, ‘mental illness’ became something entirely different. Something beyond the Freudian couch. Something marketable. Profitable.

“The NIMH scientists drew the only possible conclusion: “Elevations or decrements in the functioning of serotonergic systems per se are not likely to be associated with depression.”

Prozac whispers something different. Magazines. TV. Neighborhood gossip. The word is out—but not what has been documented from the studies undertaken.

“Although these results are apparently compatible with the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia in general,” he wrote, the increase in D2 receptors might “have resulted from the long-term administration of neuroleptics.”

And we screamed: But yanking molars has saved so many!

An outcry met with a variety of studies that “quickly proved that the drugs were indeed the culprit.”

Parents don’t read these studies though. Parents rely on the robots from medical school. Schooling endorsed and kept running by the pharmaceutical giants themselves.

“It was not surprising that medical students accepted the dogma of biomedical reductionism in psychiatry uncritically; they had no time to read and analyze the original literature. What took me a while to understand, as I moved through my residency, was that psychiatrists rarely do the critical reading either.”

And on to the children. The to-be mentally unwell adults of tomorrow.

“Parents were told that children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder suffered from low dopamine levels, but the only reason they were told that was because Ritalin stirred neurons to release extra dopamine.”

“…drug-treated patients tend to have longer periods of hospitalization… The untreated patients consistently show a somewhat lower retention rate.”

“The use of neuroleptics is a trap,” he said. “It is like having a psychosis-inducing agent built right into the brain.”

“They block basal ganglia activity. The prefrontal cortex doesn’t get the input it needs and is being shot down by drugs. It also causes the prefrontal cortex to slowly atrophy.”

“I said, ‘Scott, if I ever find out you are off your meds, I will come to Houston and shoot you.’ That’s what I said to him. And here he is doing everything he thinks he needs to do to be functional in our society, to be a productive member of society, and it kills him.”

“The story of research into selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use in childhood depression is one of confusion, manipulation, and institutional failure,” the Lancet wrote in a 2004 editorial. The fact that psychologists at leading medical schools had participated in this scientific fraud constituted an “abuse of the trust patients place in their physicians.”

“Twenty years ago, our society began regularly prescribing psychiatric drugs to children and adolescents, and now one out of every fifteen Americans enters adulthood with a “serious mental illness”.”

“All was fine in Jasmine’s life until the summer after fifth grade. Because she still occasionally wet her bed, she was conscious about going away to camp, and so a doctor prescribed a “bed-wetting” pill, which happened to be a tricyclic antidepressant. Very quickly, Jasmine became agitated and hostile, and one afternoon she told her mom: “I’m having all these horrible thoughts. I feel like I’m going to kill people.”

A quoted finale for all those naysayers. All those that say where’s the evidence—and that’s the right question. Where is it?

It is hidden. It is de-popularized and spewed out as something altogether different. An empty promise and a script for life.

I’m caught in a whirlwind of disbelief, having finished my nursing education only a few short years ago. I did my psych rotation on the corner of Girard and something and I was taught about the unknown surrounding neuroleptics, but nonetheless how everyone finds a cocktail that suits them. A fix for something incurable.

As you read Robert Whitaker’s book, he tells a different story. His words are drenched in reality. The reality that the mentally unwell are not chronically doomed and that those untreated are able to cope and become mentally well within months. That this recent upsurge in psychopaths is nothing but a society being swindled into a diagnosis—left to be taken advantage of as the ill become truly ill.

And then you learn that bipolar disorder ceased to exist prior to this pocketed innovation. And then—

Read his book for more. My post is only the tip of the iceberg. If my post even slightly gurgles your stomach unsettled, then maybe it’s time to embrace reality.

And because I cannot help myself—is it disturbing to know that some of the elite in the APA, the same ones that have funneled published books describing these miracle drugs for years, contrary to evidence, have been booed off the stage by the doctors they’ve trained. Not for their missteps, but because they’ve admitted their wrong and that the evidence has been saying it for years. So as they tinker away and hopefully begin to distance themselves from pharmaceuticals and back to the hug of a sofa, we must recognize, NOW, that such indecision and contrasting opinions only hurt us.

Take action and stop turning little Jesse into one of the many compromised minds that pulls the trigger or one of the mush-brains in a community home—because you thought he or she was too hyper.

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